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Message Board > Malarkey > Let's work together on this idea!

May 11, 2020, 10:51
Dennis
どこかにいる
2018 posts

My dream of becoming a programmer became reality so nowadays I do technical reviews and write analyses in Word and track my changes in Excel. It's truly amazing.

Seriously, I am still doing consultancy as a PL/SQL analyst developer, but it's more analyst than developer nowadays (because of the nature of the company I am working for). I never expected the "boring" stuff actually got much more interesting as I got older.

What changed dramatically is that I offer my business now on a freelance basis. That means I started my own company counting 1 person. Using the company I also acquired a YoYo Games license to do some r&d in games programming. so far, it actually looks ok. Not a fan of the drag n drop of course, but it seems like quite a powerful system. I like to have all my tools in one product, like the good old DIV days, and while Unity was fun to try too, I think GameMaker matured quite well. I am not a hardcore programmer anymore either, I am more interested in software design, than in the pure programming part.

I mean, it's cool you can have great code, but it's also nice to be able to create a great game that is fun.
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Kwakkel
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May 12, 2020, 13:26
Rincewind
programmer
1493 posts

I agree doing the design is good fun but maybe after that becomes stressful when you're going to have to put it together. I also experience graphic design and sound creation as much more fun than programming itself. So the fun really starts for me when I am far in programming and start doing the other things. Anyway I took on programming as main skill, else I get nowhere. :)
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Weblog: http://www.strictlyrational.com updated 24-7-2012
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May 12, 2020, 20:41
PB
Defender of the faith
589 posts

I never wanted to create games professionally, but I did want to become a programmer, so I did.

I enjoy writing features that help customers in their work while aiming to exceed their expectations.

Basically I parked my hobby to create games once I started studying computer science. But when I recently found out about FUZE4 Nintendo Switch, I did pick it up again. It was fun, but for me it's fun as a side project, nothing serious.
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May 16, 2020, 16:29
Rincewind
programmer
1493 posts

Quoting PB:
Basically I parked my hobby to create games once I started studying computer science.


When I was studying I parked my study to program on a game for half a year! :P I like programming both games and serious software. Also it is good to know the other part of a programming language.
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Weblog: http://www.strictlyrational.com updated 24-7-2012
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May 18, 2020, 22:55
PB
Defender of the faith
589 posts

In my opinion, a big part of programming comes down to skill. Of course no need to learn about language features and patterns, but in the end you need the skill to build something solid as well.

And a big part of skill comes down to training. So I agree that it's a good idea to not always build the same thing in different variations.

I would also recommend reading the code by other developers. Since that may help you discover patterns or language features that you wouldn't otherwise have discovered yourself.
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May 25, 2020, 12:34
Dennis
どこかにいる
2018 posts

Quoting PB:
In my opinion, a big part of programming comes down to skill. Of course no need to learn about language features and patterns, but in the end you need the skill to build something solid as well.

And a big part of skill comes down to training. So I agree that it's a good idea to not always build the same thing in different variations.

I would also recommend reading the code by other developers. Since that may help you discover patterns or language features that you wouldn't otherwise have discovered yourself.


I tend to disagree on this a bit. I think it's important to have reusable code that is robust enough to fit different situations and is easy understandable.

I'd recommend 10 lines of code that are easy to follow than 1 line of code that is complete gibberish.

Because you might understand what it does, but that doesn't mean someone else who will look at your code later will. And he will lose time (=money) trying to figure out what it does.

Also looking at other people's code is also a way to learn how something should not be done. Sometimes the code is bad. It will work so it is in production, but it is still bad. And then you might adopt bad habits.

It's always important to always be critical when seeing other people's code.

a.k.a.

"Who the fuck wrote this piece of shit?" -- Oh it was me 6 years ago.
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Kwakkel
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May 28, 2020, 23:31
Fiona
games are terrible
-9616558 posts

the worst part about becoming a better developer is you realise you don't know shit and also it takes twenty times longer to write code because you can't help yourself but to do it "properly"

look at this site, i wrote this 15 years ago over like a couple of weeks, but would probably take me months now lmao

at least it wouldn't be so full of hilarious bugs and security holes

[Edited on May 28, 2020 by Fiona]
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laffo
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May 29, 2020, 11:18
Rincewind
programmer
1493 posts

Yes, absolutely Fiona. I started making a map editer in Java, with the idea to make a simple editer. I did want to make it properly and better structured than old projects. That is why it is now taking longer than I would have thought. Then again I also don't quit the project now because "there is nothing wrong with it still".
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Weblog: http://www.strictlyrational.com updated 24-7-2012
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May 29, 2020, 22:29
PB
Defender of the faith
589 posts

Quoting Dennis:
Quoting PB:
In my opinion, a big part of programming comes down to skill. Of course no need to learn about language features and patterns, but in the end you need the skill to build something solid as well.

And a big part of skill comes down to training. So I agree that it's a good idea to not always build the same thing in different variations.

I would also recommend reading the code by other developers. Since that may help you discover patterns or language features that you wouldn't otherwise have discovered yourself.

I tend to disagree on this a bit. I think it's important to have reusable code that is robust enough to fit different situations and is easy understandable.

I'd recommend 10 lines of code that are easy to follow than 1 line of code that is complete gibberish.

Because you might understand what it does, but that doesn't mean someone else who will look at your code later will. And he will lose time (=money) trying to figure out what it does.

Also looking at other people's code is also a way to learn how something should not be done. Sometimes the code is bad. It will work so it is in production, but it is still bad. And then you might adopt bad habits.

It's always important to always be critical when seeing other people's code.

a.k.a.

"Who the fuck wrote this piece of shit?" -- Oh it was me 6 years ago.


I 100% agree that it's important to write code that is easy to understand, but that also takes skill.

"I think it's important to have reusable code that is robust enough to fit different situations"
That I disagree with. Having that type of code tends to make it complex. If you create a function that is used for many situations, then it becomes really difficult for someone to make a change to that function without being sure nothing breaks. It's better to give a function a single responsibility.


"Because you might understand what it does, but that doesn't mean someone else who will look at your code later will. And he will lose time (=money) trying to figure out what it does."
I agree with that thought, but that's also not what I meant. Of course it's important to always be critical about your coding and also to strife for simple, easy to understand code. Platforms like Sonar can also help you with improving code quality and reduce complexity.

However, often languages evolve with new features that may be quite intuitive to understand. Or they may have old features that did not really stick with you, but are actually useful. If you don't know about them, you won't use them, and you'd write your own code to do something that can be done with an build-in language feature.

I think it's more colleague friendly to ask of them to learn language features, than to figure out what you tried to do with your own implementation (if that could have been done with a language feature).
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July 26, 2020, 13:20
Rincewind
programmer
1493 posts

Anyone still programming? :)

One more thing that is important in serious programming, is the time facter. I'm so often without any time on my hands. What I noticed is that the longer I program on an end, the more problem cracking I become. It looks like when I am doing a test in school, nearby the finishing time of the test I write all the last answers down (consider the problems cracked at last). So what is important when I want to have enough time to program, is that I schedule large work blocks for myself that I can continue working in until every problem has been cracked at the end.

Otherwise, I just skip over many problems and never really seem to finish. Does anyone ever experience the same?
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Weblog: http://www.strictlyrational.com updated 24-7-2012
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July 26, 2020, 13:33
PB
Defender of the faith
589 posts

The worst is, if you're in the middle of major refactoring and you have a lot of open ends. If you get interrupted in such work, then that costs so much time. You need to build up the context again in your head. You may have forgotten about some of the open ends, resulting in bugs that are found much later.
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Message Board > Malarkey > Let's work together on this idea!

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